Plantar Fascitis

Description

  • Inflammation of the insertion of the plantar fascia to the heel bone (calcaneus) resulting from repeated injuries or stresses.
  • May be occasionally associated with a LENOIR SPINE, which results from calcification but is not necessarily symptomatic.
  • Without appropriate treatment, this condition can develop into a chronic and recurring problem. The presence of a partial or complete tear of the plantar fascia is possible.
plantar-fascitis

Presentation

  • Begins with a dull and intermittent pain in the heel that can evolve into persistent acute pain.
  • The pain can also be present in the middle of the sole of the foot or near the toes.
  • Pain generally present in the morning during the first steps, after a prolonged sitting period or at the beginning of a sporting activity.
  • May cause low back or knee pain due to tread adjustment.

Causes

  • Flat feet in pronation
  • Rigid Feet with High Arch
  • Extended standing position
  • Shoes not suitable, inadequate or too worn
  • Abuse of exercise (“too much effort, too early” syndrome)
  • Soft ground (running on sand)
  • Activities involving stops and sudden changes of direction
  • Stiffness of Achilles tendon and calf muscles
  • Obesity
  • Aging

Treatments

  • Decreased inflammation with ice (20 minutes / 2 hours) and complementary therapies such as neurocryotherapy and kinesio taping.
  • Articular manipulations and soft tissue work (Active Release Techniques and Graston) to correct the biomechanics of the foot and reduce the scar tissue
  • Exercises to soften the plantar fascia and the Achilles tendon
  • Exercises to strengthen and stabilize the foot
  • Plantar orthoses for treating or preventing the condition
  • Change in activities
  • Drugs (anti-inflammatory) as needed
  • Cortisone injections as needed
  • Very rare surgical interventions
  • Plasma-rich plasma
Source: Association of Chiropractors of Quebec